Keep up-to-date with Free tutorials!!

 

Sign up to our twice-monthly newsletter today for the latest tutorials, interviews and product information.

Sign me up to receive third-party emails from 3dtotal's partners, too!

- Latest news
- Exclusive Shop Offers
- Preview early content
- Plus much more

 

Not Ready to take that step? OK, Why not just Subscribe to the RSS Feed

 
submit tutorial
1 | 2 | 3
The making of 'A cup of tea?'

By Yu Sun

| Your Rating:
rating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star none
(8 Votes)
| 32045 Views
| 1 Comments
| Comments 1
Date Added: 31st October 2014
Software used:

Yu Sun works through the process behind his traditional artist-inspired image, made using 3ds Max, ZBrush, Photoshop, and V-Ray?


1943_tid_00.jpg

1943_tid_zzarist.jpg

Sometimes I wonder what the characters of great artworks from history would do in the modern age. So I created this picture: A cup of tea? I wanted them to look like they were experiencing the charm of Chinese Kung Fu tea in a Chinese teahouse, but the man who makes their tea looks like a newbie.

So, next I'll describe the creation of the artwork and talk about my general production process.

Planning time and collecting data

A cup of tea? is my latest work, and it took about two and a half months in total to finish. Most 3D practitioners know that planning a cycle to control the quality is important. We can't avoid the problem; all we can do is take a short amount of time to plan, in order to achieve the quality and efficiency of a win-win situation. So when I started this project, I set up an overall time estimate and began to plan a general plan as follows:

? Weeks 1-2: (The early stage of the design, collecting data)
? Weeks 3-4: (The early modeling, sculptures of the high poly model)
? Weeks 5-8: (Attention to detail , texturing)
? Weeks 9-10: (Hair, rendering, post processing)

The first stage, I mainly figure is more in accordance with your own goals, so choose photographs and inspirations as you prefer for your image. Then you can draw a rough design. If you prefer, you can also use 3D software such as 3ds Max or ZBrush to rough out a simple simulation of the human body.

1943_tid_01.jpg
The composition and initial data compilation is done

Modeling technique

Because the action in the scene is a bit much and I can't take on all of the accuracy and integrity of each individual all at once, I go by the philosophy ?divide and conquer'. When I reach a certain point with each model, I set the benchmark and continue onto the next one.

So to start, I began with the production of Van Gogh and his sunflower. Because this is a famous art painting, the search is reveals relatively good data. At the same time though, the production is made more challenging because the image must match that data perfectly.

1943_tid_02.jpg
Modeling the sunflower

Modeling Van Gogh

The key to modeling the sunflower is to use the Move brush and sculpt from the inside to the outside. The key to modeling Van Gogh is depict the feeling of the Van Gogh's nervousness, and show that he wants to protect his
precious sunflower.

The pores of the sculpture were made with the DamStandard brush with four kinds of alpha. I draw these out by hand, and then carved them into the face using reference images. Although it takes some time, it can create a very
good effect.

1943_tid_03.jpg
Modeling the nervousness of Van Gogh

Modeling Van Gogh's clothes

The production of Van Gogh's clothing as a whole was a little different. For this image I tested some new software called Marvelous Designer (MD) to create the clothing, but because it was my first attempt, it did not create a particularly good effect and actually increased the testing time a lot. All in all though, it's a really good software and is worth a try.

Now I can use MD smoothly though, and I hope I can enlighten you with its techniques in the future. This time though, because the software didn't work for me, I used the old way of finding a good reference to carve the clothing from. Where do you get the references from? You don't need to buy new clothes for this; the internet is full of clothing reference images you can browse through.

1943_tid_04.jpg
Making Van Gogh's clothing from scratch


continued on next page >

 
1 | 2 | 3
Related Tutorials

Crafting character animation

by Kiel Figgins
published on 2015-02-06

Keywords: animation, 3d, character, pose

rating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star half (8)
Comments 0 Views 26635

Making Of 'The Worm'

by Raymond O'Doul
published on 2009-12-09

Keywords: character, creature, worm, cartoon,

rating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star half (3)
Comments 2 Views 61767

Making Of 'There is always a bigger rat'

by dOUGh
published on 2009-12-09

Keywords: scene, corridor, gun, rat, character,

rating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star full (1)
Comments 0 Views 15152

Making Of 'Scarecrow'

by Darko Hanzic
published on 2009-12-09

Keywords: character, scene, scarecrow, field,

rating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star fullrating star full (3)
Comments 0 Views 143681
Readers Comments (Newest on Top)
avatar
Aotuhm on Wed, 06 May 2015 10:53am
Great tutorial and great work! Forgive my ignorance, but who's the guy with the Iphone (the thinking guy on the right with denim clothes and a watch)?
Add Your Comment..