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Making of 'Walther P99'

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Date Added: 29th October 2009
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And finally, for the ground I used a high definition map of concrete. I added a gradient ramp to recreate the dark area present in the background of the image, and an RGB Multiply to tint the diffuse (Fig.08).

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Fig. 08

Lighting

For the lighting, I used a simple skylight with an HDR map (Fig.09 & Fig.10).

128_tid_fig09.jpg
Fig. 09

128_tid_fig10.jpg
Fig. 10

Render

I wanted to render a high definition image in this scene using a minimum rendering time to justify the use of a normal pass, rather than creating a three-point lighting setup which would need a longer rendering time and less work in post-production. 

For the indirect lighting, I used Final Gather with the settings shown in Fig.11.

128_tid_fig11.jpg
Fig. 11

I think I succeeded in correctly making a render in high definition (1950x1100), with a minimal calculation time - only 1 hour, 30 minutes to make the scene, with all the passes, on an old Pentium 4.  The 3ds Max output image can be seen in Fig.12.

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Fig. 12



Post-Production

Post production was the most important step in the project. Up until this stage, I just had an image with a flat light created by the skylight. Because of this, I rendered a normal pass so that I could play in real time with a three-point lighting setup. I also rendered a pass to recreate the rounded corners on the normal pass and an ambient occlusion pass allowed me to recreate, the shadows present on the output image from Max. Once done, I extracted the red, green and blue layers to play with my three-point lighting in real time. I added a little depth of field... and voila! (Fig.13)

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Fig. 13

The final image can be seen in Fig.14.

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Fig.14

Conclusion

I really loved working on this image, and I particularly enjoyed the techniques I got to use in post-production. They proved very efficient for a fixed image and allowed me to considerably reduce the rendering time!

I hope you have enjoyed this "Making Of".
 



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Readers Comments (Newest on Top)
avatar
Christopher on Thu, 19 December 2013 10:16pm
This is SO hard to model! I too am having great difficulty with the grip xD
avatar
JotaErre on Fri, 24 August 2012 4:58pm
Greets from Guatemala! I really like the final result. I am a bit confused about the process: Did you UV Map the gun model??? Or is it procedurally textured? :P
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