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Making Of 'Brave New World' - Total Texture Breakdown

By Ashish Dani
Web: Open Site
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Date Added: 11th October 2012
Software used:
3ds Max, Maya

Dirt Mask Creation

I created a dirt mask, which is used to switch between the relative_clean and dirty texture maps. This mask needs to be procedural in nature because when I start to distribute the various buildings, the mask automatically adjusts to show continuity.

The logic behind the mask is to mix various procedural noise patterns within a clamped real-time ambient occlusion. You can use any noise patterns that you like so long as it does not look too uniform. I do recommend mixing various noise types to get the final look. You can see the dirt mask applied to the geo set in Fig.06.

1606_tid_fig06.jpg
Fig.06

To show the automatic adjustment of the dirt mask, I took a small geo "B04" and applied the mask to it (Fig.07). You can see the variation in the noise pattern.

1606_tid_fig07.jpg
Fig.07

I duplicated B04 (Instance) and rotated it 90 degrees. You can see that the Dirt mask automatically creates a rim of pattern where the two geometry blocks meet (Fig.08).

1606_tid_fig08.jpg
Fig.08

If I move the new instance in any direction the mask automatically adjusts to the position. Note that each movement creates a unique pattern (Fig.09 - 10).

1606_tid_fig09.jpg
Fig.09
1606_tid_fig10.jpg
Fig.10

Texturing

I started by first establishing a look for the relative_clean shader. The process for it was quite simple. You can go about it in one of two ways:

1. Using Layered Texture (Maya)

• Create a new file node
• Link the required texture file to it
• Link the newly created file node into the layered texture.

2. Using Composite Map (3ds Max)

• Click on Create a New Layer
• Click on the map/node slot and choose Bitmap from the options
• Browse and link to the texture file.

Relative Clean Shader


1606_tid_relative_clean_shader.jpg
Relative Clean Shader

1606_tid_fig11.jpg
Fig.11
1606_tid_fig12.jpg
Fig.12

1606_tid_fig13.jpg
Fig.13





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Readers Comments (Newest on Top)
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(ID: 180323, pid: 0) Qinglin Zhao on Thu, 07 February 2013 12:44am
Very good, very useful tutorial, hope more detailed ah, thank you?
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(ID: 177249, pid: 0) Steve on Sat, 19 January 2013 4:18pm
Thank you. I look at images like these and think '1 day.... maybe..... if I try really hard......my stuff might come close' :)
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