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La Ruelle Lighting: Fog / Mist (Damp) At Night-Time

By Andrzej Sykut
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Date Added: 18th April 2011
Software used:
3ds Max, V-Ray

Another solution is to adjust the exposure. To do that in Vray, we need to use VRayPhysicalCamera, which allows us to work in a photographic manner - setting f-number, ISO, and shutter speed, among others. I aligned it to the original camera using the Align tool - but it still needed some offset to match. After some attempts, I settled on the settings pictured in (Fig.09).

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Fig. 09

VRayPhysicalCamera also provides the settings for vignetting, very handy even if it will be finely tuned during post production. While playing with exposure, we may continue with a more photographic approach, and change the white balance. When doing night photography, playing with WB can give nice, rich colors in seemingly plain light (Fig.10).

1219_tid_image_10.jpg
Fig. 10

To illuminate the fog a bit, we need more light - we need the aforementioned ambient light. But we are not going to use the Ambient setting, nor will we use a Skylight solution. Sky will be handled by a big Vray Light above the whole scene, colored teal (Fig.11), and one smaller Vray Light, angled slightly towards the camera, placed just above the roof. Moonlight will be done using a standard Max

Directional light, placed above the camera. Because I don't want the front facing walls to be lit too much, I built a simple shadow-caster object, simulating the other side of the street (Fig.12). For placing such lights, where shadow is even more important than the light, it's good to use viewport shadows display. I use it for almost all lights in the scene, but it really works well with one or two as with any more they tend to cancel each other out.

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Fig. 11


1219_tid_image_12.jpg
Fig. 12

I didn't want any direct light on the front facing walls, but I wanted to suggest some world off screen. I used three Omni lights, projecting a quickly stitched image of tree branches, to simulate some streetlights hidden behind the trees (Fig.13).

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Fig. 13





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(ID: 44808, pid: 0) Giovanni on Thu, 23 June 2011 7:14am
Great tut, thanks!
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(ID: 40668, pid: 0) APrather on Wed, 20 April 2011 6:35pm
Too bad cannot see everything in setting... picture's too small.. no way to expand it.
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(ID: 40592, pid: 0) JOBATEck EL-ATTAF on Tue, 19 April 2011 11:01am
iT'S ONE OF MOST GRATEST 3D WORK CONTINIOUS MAN EAT 3D
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