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The Career Path of Alan Camara

By Jo Hargreaves

Web: http://www.alanbrainart.blogspot.com/ (will open in new window)
Email: [email protected]

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Date Added: 5th August 2013


What can people expect from working in the industry?

Even though the world economy is still in a recovery stage, I believe that there is a great demand for artists. I always receive emails from Brazil and abroad inquiring about my work, and asking for an estimate of costs. In my opinion, apart from talent, hard work and dedication will increase one's chances of being successful.

What are the key things that a great portfolio must have?

The most important thing is to show how solid your technique is. It is also important to show that you have the capacity to apply your technique with your team.

I also believe that an artist should always be present in social media. It is a necessity when it comes to establishing what you are capable of. It is equally important to specialize in your work and be creative.


Where would you like to be in five years' time?

I believe I could go further in my professional career, but I've decided to slow down a bit since I don't want to be far from my family. I also have plans to open a studio so that I can broaden my contacts.

Looking back with the benefit of your experience, are there things you would do differently in your training/career if you had the chance to do it over again?

I wish I had studied more. I could have spent more hours in the study of traditional arts such as sculpture, and especially painting and drawing. I believe that at some point in life, all 3D artists will realize the importance of such background foundations to further improve their work.

If you could give one piece of advice to people looking to break into the industry, what would it be?

The first thing - and I believe this is already a consensus between those who want to start their careers - is to study a lot before getting stuck into 3D software. Artistic anatomy, composition, light and shadow, and all the rest are essential foundations for the 3D artist. In the past, many people wanted to make 3D and a lot of errors were committed by them not having these essentials.

Learning artistic rules at the same time as we learn 3D software is a mistake. My advice is: learn it all first. Study traditional techniques such as drawing, sculpture and photography. Get enough information and the learning process will be much easier. Good luck!


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Readers Comments (Newest on Top)
(ID: 210355, pid: 0) Luid Borges on Tue, 06 August 2013 2:30am
Congratulations to Alan Camara, a know his job in Buzios, RJ - Brazil . Is perfect!
(ID: 210294, pid: 0) MauricioPC on Mon, 05 August 2013 4:39pm
Great work Alan. Congrats!!!
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