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10 top 3D texturing tips


By Poz Watson


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Date Added: 18th February 2014
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Some of the world's most exciting 3D artists share their top tricks and pro tips to help you master modeling and become an all-round better artist


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If concept artists are the dreamers of the 3D world, then the texture artists are the detail guys. These are the people who believe not only in dotting every ‘i' and crossing every ‘t', but polishing every blade of grass too, and giving even the newest and cleanest tank a tiny spot of rust. And if that's naturally you, then you probably love giving your work texture. If it's not naturally you, then read on, and see if what our experts say inspire you to mess up those models a little.

"You don't need to create all the tiny details in your sculpting software. Many times, especially when texturing cloth or other types of small tileable details, I use Photoshop to add those details” José Alves da Silva



Tip 1: Hair today, gone tomorrow

"I model the hair meshes on my characters as neatly as I can, making the topology flow like real hair would. This way, I can UVUnwrap the model, straighten out the topology strips and then simply use a stretched (or motion blurred in Photoshop) noise texture to create the look of stylized hair strands.” Andrew Hickinbottom

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Every strand of hair is worth working on


Tip 2: Organic options

"Useful tools like the Dry brush in Mudbox (and similar brushes on equivalent software) can help quickly to paint worn-out zones in organic and non-organic surfaces. Since it can grab only peaks or valleys you can easily paint the zones of the object that are more exposed and therefore more susceptible to ‘damage'. Along with a cavity map you can quickly paint rust on hard surfaces or dust/dirt on organic objects.” Carlos Ortega Elizalde


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Making things dusty, dirty and generally imperfect is the name of the game


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Carlos Ortega Elizalde likes to use the Dry brush in Mudbox to create some of his textures © Carlos Ortega Elizalde


Tip 3: PolyPaint in ZBrush

"To PolyPaint my models I use a simple scheme I created. 1 is the main color; 2 is the secondary main color; 3 is a lighter and darker variations of the main colors; 4 is a warmer variation of the main colors blended with the color of the blood; 5 is a desaturated variation and 6 is the pattern colors.” Luca Nemolato

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Plan your own way of doing things, but have a system to keep your colors and textures clear




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